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Single Layer Graphene (Graphene Factory)

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SKU# 137

Product Detail

Single-layer graphene has emerged as a highly capable material that has the ability to replace outdated technologies and benefit countless industries. Incredibly lightweight yet highly durable, graphene is able to conduct a high level of electricity through a miniscule amount of material. Applications of graphene include small electrical circuits and outlets, medical equipment, solar cells, and more. Due to its flexible nature, many industry leaders have begun using graphene as a way to ensure the safety of their various equipment while not risking its efficiency. Single-layer graphene has proven to be an incredibly reliable resource that is both cost efficient and energy efficient.

CAS No.: 7782-42-5 

Preparation Method Thermal exfoliation reduction + Hydrogen reduction      
BET surface area (m2/g) 650~750          
Conductivity (S/m) 500~700
Layers     1-5 atomic layer graphene nanosheets
Lateral size (µm) 0.5-5
Oxygen (at%) 7-7.5

TEM Image of Single Layer Graphene

TEM Image of Single Layer Graphene (ACS Material-Graphene Factory)

SEM Image of Single Layer Graphene

SEM Image of Single Layer Graphene (ACS Material-Graphene Factory)

HRTEM Image of Single Layer Graphene

HRTEM Image of Single Layer Graphene (ACS Material-Graphene Factory)

XRD Patterns of Single Layer Graphene (ACS Material-Graphene Factory)

XPS Patterns of Single Layer Graphene (ACS Material-Graphene Factory)

Raman Spectrum of Single Layer Graphene (ACS Material-Graphene Factory)

Research Citations of ACS Material Products

  1. Chaiyo, Sudkate, et al. “Electrochemical sensors for the simultaneous determination of zinc, cadmium and lead using a Nafion/Ionic liquid/Graphene composite modified screen-Printed carbon electrode.” Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 918, 2016, pp. 26–34., doi:10.1016/j.aca.2016.03.026.
  2. Illakkiya, J. Tamil, et al. “Nebulized spray pyrolysis: a new method for synthesis of graphene film and their characteristics.” Surface and Coatings Technology, vol. 307, 2016, pp. 65–72., doi:10.1016/j.surfcoat.2016.08.051.
  3. Illakkiya, J. Tamil, et al. “Nanoarchitectured Semiconducting Photoelectrodes for Enhanced Stability and Photon Conversion Efficiency.” Carbon, vol. 111, 2017, pp. 713–721., doi:10.1016/j.carbon.2016.09.042.
  4. Nieto, Andy, et al. “Graphene reinforced metal and ceramic matrix composites: a review.” International Materials Reviews, vol. 62, no. 5, 2016, pp. 241–302., doi:10.1080/09506608.2016.1219481.
  5. Tiwari, Santosh Kr., et al. “Conductive Polymer Composites Based on Carbon Nanomaterials.” Springer Series on Polymer and Composite Materials Conducting Polymer Hybrids, Mar. 2016, pp. 117–142., doi:10.1007/978-3-319-46458-9_4.
  6. Chaiyo, Sudkate, et al. “Non-Enzymatic electrochemical detection of glucose with a disposable paper-Based sensor using a cobalt phthalocyanine–ionic liquid–graphene composite.” Biosensors and Bioelectronics, vol. 102, 2018, pp. 113–120., doi:10.1016/j.bios.2017.11.015.
  7. Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara, Vladan Anićijević, Miloš Baljozović, Dragana Vasić Anićijević, Sanjin Gutić, Vesna Vasić, Natalia V. Skorodumova, and Igor A. Pašti. "The impact of the structure of graphene-based materials on the removal of organophosphorus pesticides from water." Environmental Science: Nano (2018).
  8. Ali, Nafisa, Priyabrata Pal, Fawzi Banat, and Chandrasekar Srinivasakannan. "Selective removal of diethanolamine from methyldiethanolamine solution using chemically reduced single-layer graphene and activated carbon." Separation Science and Technology (2018): 1-11.